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How Is Child Support Collected?

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By Lonnie Nelson
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How Is Child Support Collected

When a divorce occurs, both parents are often asked to provide documentation regarding their income and expenses. This information will help the court determine what the child’s support payments should be. The person entitled to child support should also be able to prove that he or she has other children. In some cases, an upward modification of child support may be appropriate based on a change in the cost of living. This type of modification may be requested periodically, which saves both parents from repeat court appearances.

In most states, child support payments are collected by the state through a central depository system. The non-custodial parent pays the amount into the system, which then distributes it to the custodial parent. The clerk of the court may charge an administrative fee for this service. Many parties also agree to pay child support outside of the court system, provided there is no delinquency. Other parties choose to pay by cash or direct deposit. However, electronic payment of child support can provide good records and an efficient process.

Child support payments can be collected in three ways: electronic payments, direct deposits, and bank checks. Each method of payment is appropriate for different circumstances. To determine which payment method is most appropriate for you, consult a child support attorney. If your income is inconsistent with what is reported on your tax return, work with a child support lawyer to determine what you owe your child support.

If you are not able to make payments, you can ask the court to collect child support payments on your behalf. If you do not pay, the court may order the employer to garnish your wages to collect the money. Once this is done, the child support payments will continue in the same amount until you catch up on payments.

Federal law requires states to recoup child support. Federal child support laws have been in place since the 1970s. Parents who fail to pay child support may face penalties, including suspension of driver’s licenses and other consequences. In addition to federal penalties, states that don’t recoup child support must pay it out of their own coffers. Colorado and Washington have both agreed to reimburse federal child support, but they do so only partially.

Child support payments are processed by the Department of Revenue (DOR) on a weekly or monthly basis. In some cases, the child support payment due date will be stated in the child support order. The payment period runs from the first to the last day of the month. On the first day of each month, the DOR calculates child support due for the month.

Enforcement of child support orders can be challenging. In some cases, parents are not able to pay their obligation due to delinquency. The state’s child support enforcement office may take action against the non-paying parent by seizing his or her bank accounts or assets, or even seizing their driver’s license or passport. Additionally, if the child support order is unpaid, the state may contact the credit reporting agencies.

Child support payments may also be changed if the paying parent changes jobs or income. The child support amount is not changed automatically, so if the paying parent changes jobs, he or she must apply for a modification. The new job may increase the amount of child support payments, but it is important to note that the judge cannot modify a child support order without a change in circumstances.

The Child Support Program also allows parents to request a cost of living adjustment to their child support order. These adjustments can be requested without going to court. A request for cost of living adjustments can be made by either parent. In addition, the custodial parent must request the change to the Child Support Program.

Child support payments are usually due until the child reaches the age of 18 or graduates from high school. Sometimes, the parties may agree to continue paying child support until the child graduates from college. There are some circumstances, however, that prevent a child from becoming adult. For instance, a child might need special medical care, which would require additional payments. These payments may also be required to support a disabled child.

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